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Crocheting for the Future

5/21/2014 3:21:00 PM

Tags: Crochet, Baby Afghan, Yarn, Mary Conley

Mary ConleyDear friends,

Do you like to knit or crochet? I crochet some, and have made a baby afghan for each of our nine grandchildren. But, since I don't crochet often, it was a labor of love each time.

Following the maze of directions is what is difficult for me. My mother taught me to crochet when I was young, and she always explained each pattern. It is far easier to just do it, than getting lost while reading all that repetitious lingo. However, after figuring out how to do the more difficult eighth and ninth baby afghans, I have a little more confidence in understanding the instructions.

pink baby

#8 _ A pink one for Sophie Kate makes eight!

blue baby

#9_ A blue one for baby Elliott.

Unfortunately, and believe me, it is unfortunate, I'm also a bit of a perfectionist, and often do something wrong and have to rip out a bit. Some people can leave in a mistake, but I can't. That is why I'll never crochet a big afghan. If I had to rip out such long rows, I would probably put it away and never finish it.

Here is what I've come up with: During the next few years, I'm going to try (I said, try) to crochet for the future. I think it would be fun to make a few baby afghans, wash, box up nicely, and have them ready for my great-grandchildren! Don't you think that a splendid idea?! Can't you just see this frail old lady ... (Larry says he can't quite see me as frail) ... OK, can’t you see this pleasantly plump old lady at the baby shower when my granddaughter opens a present of a pretty, soft, baby afghan? She'll half whisper in surprise, "Grandma, did you REALLY make this?" and I'll say, "Sure did. Just whipped it up last week!"

yellow baby

The is the first one to stash away. I need to learn a new pattern!

Actually, I have the first one finished already. It is yellow and cheerful, and it was so fun to make while thinking about the sweet little baby that will be snuggled in it someday! When I showed it to Larry, he said, "What makes you think our first great-grandchild will be a girl?" Oh oh! I guess I'd better buy some blue yarn and get started on the next one. I'm not very fast, but I'm in luck. None of my grandchildren are even married yet!



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NebraskaDave
5/24/2014 10:15:42 AM
Mary, you are too funny. If I made something that far ahead, I'd probably either forget that I had made it or forget where I put it. My mother was a crocheting person and once spent nye on twenty years making a very large table cloth. She was a persistently patient person. Of course she took a child raising hiatus for some of the middle years of those two decades. I'm not sure what ever became of that master piece after she passed on. I do remember her spending countless hours working on it when she could. She was always a busy person doing something. Rarely did she ever just sit and do nothing. I'm not nearly like her but I did inherit some of those qualities. ***** Planning ahead as you are doing is a great way to be prepared for those future great grand children. I have one grand child already married and another that's graduating high school this year so I shutter to think how close I am to being great grand father. I still remember my great grand father being this old frail guy that could only sit in his chair and smoke his pipe. Well, I don't smoke a pipe but I just don't think of myself as old and frail just yet. ***** Have a great crocheting day.



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