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One Day Bookshelf Project

2/16/2014 5:36:00 PM

Tags: Bookshelf, DIY Projects, Repurpose Old Doors, Easy Building Project, Gina Gaines

Gina GainesSeveral years ago I made a bookshelf out of old louver doors and a few wooden boards.  The poor thing has been dismantled and repainted three times and you'll probably notice in the photos that it needs yet another coat of paint.  We're currently remodeling this room and the bookshelf was put up in a hurry to get the books out of storage.  Taking it apart, painting it, and putting it back together is probably going to be on my honey-do list this summer!  

This bookshelf is really easy to make and can be free if you have some old doors lying around.  The louvers in these doors were about 12 inches wide, just right for the scrap 6-foot shelving boards I had in my woodpile. You can use any size doors to fit your purpose.  You’ll just need to match up the boards you use as shelves to the width of the louvers.

shelf 1

Using metal brackets, I joined a pair of matching doors to a board cut to the same height.  This created the back of the bookshelf.  If you only have one set of louvers, you can use an old solid door or leftover lumber for the back.  I left the hinges on the doors and just created the sides of the bookshelf by bringing the left and right panels around toward me.  Make sure to position the doors so that they swing in the same direction to make the back and sides before joining them.  Then secure one of your shelving boards to the top of the doors.   Using wood screws to fasten the top board will make it easier to dismantle if you need to later.  Also, I think screws make the shelf sturdier than nails would.

shelf 2

Once the back, sides and top are stable, you’ll need to knock out opposing louvers on the left and right sides so that you can slide your boards through to create the shelves.  I used a hammer and a large screwdriver, but you can use a small saw if you have one.  After the louvers are out, sand the area smooth and just slide in the boards to create your shelves.  If you are going to paint the bookshelf, it’s easier to paint the boards before placing them. 

That’s all there is to it!  An easy, one day project to re-purpose old louver doors into a useful and attractive shelving unit.  



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Post a comment below.

 

Gina
3/7/2014 12:35:37 PM
Thanks Dave! I've seen similar projects made from ALL KINDS of materials. LOVE creativity! We have a ReStore here too, and they've gotten quite a bit of supplies from me too. That's still "recycling" and helping folks at the same time. Nothing wasted! :)

NebraskaDave
3/2/2014 12:02:55 PM
Oops sorry about the wrong post. ***** Gina, I love to see posts of easy projects that recycle and repurpose things around the house. Your idea for book shelves are an awesome idea. However, I just gave away my old shutters to the ReStore a couple miles from my house. I guess that's OK as well because it helps the community and gives some one else some great shutters. The ReStore is run my Habitat for Humanity which has many community projects in my area. ***** Have a great bookshelf project day.

NebraskaDave
3/2/2014 12:00:43 PM
Sheila, I soooo wish we had winter markets here in Nebraska but such is not the case. The closest we can come to that is the Whole Foods store. We will start seeing the farmer's markets about the end of May until September. I'm not sure that means all of it will be organic. Some is but most is not. ***** You are so right about the harsh winter. Today here on March 2nd the temperature at 11:12am is -4 with wind chill of -21. Tomorrow will be even colder. Farmer Almanac forecasts for this area is a cold wet spring. (Big sigh) Not again. Last year was that way and garden planting couldn't be done until almost June. I guess I could say that I'm experienced at planting potatoes in the mud with muck boots on. The potatoes really weren't the best last year but at least I harvested more than I planted so the season was a some what success. The rest of the garden was three to four weeks late in producing which made that first tomato out of the garden even more special. And so it will be again this year. ***** Have a great Winter produce day.



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