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Bake Muffins With Your Extra Zucchini

8/13/2014 12:05:00 PM

Tags: Zucchini, Muffins, Homesteading, Erin Sheehan

Erin SheehanWe’ve eaten zucchini nearly every night for about a month now. Jim says he’s getting sick of it. Me, never; I love zucchini. But we really do have an awful lot of zucchini right now.

 I’ve frozen about three dozen cups of zucchini milk for future bread-baking adventures, and I froze 14 cups of shredded zucchini last night. Come the dead of winter I’ll be able to bake a few loaves of zucchini bread to remind me of summer’s bounty. I also made a batch of zucchini muffins over the weekend. Muffins and bread are a great way to use up the zucchinis that hide under your plants and get too big for just eating.

Zukes 

One thing I’ve noticed about older cookbooks is the lack of muffin recipes. My grandmother’s cookbook/recipe stash has two muffin recipes: bran and corn. Yuk! I guess people just didn’t make a lot of muffins back then. If anyone knows why or has their hands on dessert-style (fruit, sweet) muffin recipes from pre-1940, I would love to hear from you.

I adore muffins, in part because they freeze well and with 30 seconds in the microwave, I can have a tasty treat at the ready. Here’s a simple zucchini muffin recipe for you to try:

1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 cups unpeeled, shredded zucchini
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1  1/2 cups white flour (can substitute up to 1/2 whole wheat)
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

muffinsPreheat oven to 350 F. Grease and flour a regular-size muffin tin; set aside.

Combine the oil, zucchini, eggs and sugar in a large bowl.

In a second bowl mix together the flour, baking powder and soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Add the dry ingredients into the large bowl and stir just enough to combine. Add in walnuts and stir, but take care not to over-stir or your muffins will be tough.

Fill cups in prepared muffin tin just over two-thirds full with batter.

Bake for 22 to 25 minutes. Cool for about 5 minutes before trying to remove from the pan to a cooling rack. Yields about 12 muffins. Enjoy!



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NebraskaDave
8/15/2014 8:37:13 AM
Erin, yeah, sad to say that I never got the zucchini planted this year. Most of what I grow, I given away and zucchini is one of those plants that most folks will take a couple but that's it. It's been a strange garden year for me. I really had some tough weather and events to deal with and only got a few tomatoes, green peppers, potatoes, and eggplants for this year's harvest. The plan is to bounce back next year. I've been totally concentrating on garden structure this year. Fences and garden bed borders are the focus. One out of the six beds have been totally rejuvenated. A two layer rock border with old carpet for weed barrier in the pathways between the beds has been completed. On top of the carpet will soon be a layer of wood chips. Hopefully, I can get another couple beds completed and the fence finished before the snow flies. I didn't get the fence up in time to save the corn again this year. Hopefully, next year with be the year for enjoying the garden harvest. Have a great zucchini day.



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