Cheese Frittata Recipe

This Cheese Frittata Recipe is great when prepared in a cast-iron skillet.
By Jody M. Farnham and Marc Druart
October 2013
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This Cheese Frittata Recipe is best when prepared in a cast-iron skillet
Photo Courtesy Skyhorse Publishing
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(Skyhorse Publishing, 2011), by Jody M. Farnham and Marc Druart, offers easy-to-understand instructions to produce healthy, homemade cheese. Beautifully illustrated with gorgeous photographs, this comprehensive guide includes a basic overview of cheese making and aging, from the raw ingredients to the final product. The clear guidance and convenient glossary allow the reader to learn all about the cheese making process, from creating to choosing it, as well as pairing it with the right wines. The following Cheese Frittata recipe comes from Chapter 8, "Aging.”

You can purchase this book at the GRIT store: The Joy of Cheesemaking.

More from The Joy of Cheesemaking:
The Joy of Cheesemaking
Mossend Blue Cheese Scalloped Potatoes Recipe
An Introduction to Cheese Making

Cheese Frittata Recipe

Bellwether Farm's rustic veggie frittata is spectacular baked in a cast-iron pan. Every home cook has at least one well-seasoned skillet they couldn’t imagine cooking without. This is the pan to use for this delicious recipe. Cast iron is highly valued for its many cooking properties; in this case, the pan’s heat is evenly distributed, making it ideal for baking this frittata into its full rustic glory. Serves 8

2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large Spanish onion, thinly sliced
3 cloves of garlic, minced
2 small summer squash sliced 1/4-inch thick
2 small zucchini, sliced 1/4-inch thick
1 red bell pepper, seeded sliced 1/4-inch strips
4 oz fresh cremini mushrooms, sliced
4 oz fresh oyster mushrooms, sliced
7 local fresh eggs
1/4 cup whipping cream
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1 teaspoon white pepper
2 cups stale French bread cubes (1/4-inch pieces)
3 oz crème fraîche
3 oz cream cheese
2 cups grated Carmody Reserves cheese (a Manchego or Swiss will work well, too)

Preheat oven to 350 F (175 C).

Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat.

Add the onion, garlic, summer squash, zucchini, pepper, and mushrooms; sauté, stirring and tossing occasionally, until tender, 12–15 minutes.

While the veggies are cooking, whisk the eggs and cream together in a large mixing bowl. Season with salt and pepper.

Stir in the bread, crème fraîche, cream cheese, and grated cheese. Fold sautéed vegetable into the egg mixture and stir well. Heat a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat and melt butter in skillet.

Lower heat to medium-low; pour in egg and vegetable mixture. With a wooden spoon, stir bottom of skillet, loosening cooked egg, for 1–2 minutes.

Take skillet off the heat and place in oven; bake for 45–50 minutes or until the frittata is firm to the touch, puffed, and golden brown. If it’s browning too quickly, place a sheet of aluminum foil loosely over the top.

Serve warm atop field greens, such as arugula or mesclun and garnish with Red Onion Marmalade. This is also perfectly delightful served at room temperature.

Recommended wine pairing

Try a Cru Beaujolais, fresh and delicious; the raspberry-mint aroma is a perfect accent to the cheesy baked goodness. Marcel Lapierre, Morgon 2008 has mastered this wine. 

Appetite for ale

Double IPA tend to have aromas of fruit and floral, like mango and pineapple on the nose. As it warms, more herba lnotes come out along with a slight indication of the alcohol present in this brew. Try a Dreadnaught (Three Floyds Brewing Co, Munster,Indiana) or a Hopzilla Double IPA (Lawson’s Finest, Warren, Vermont).

This excerpt has been reprinted with permission from The Joy of Cheesemaking: The Ultimate Guide to Understanding, Making, and Eating Fine Cheese, published by Skyhorse Publishing, 2011. Buy this book from our store: The Joy of Cheesemaking.


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Post a comment below.

 

Sarah
10/24/2013 8:34:47 AM
Hey ArkieGirl, I'm the web editor here at Capper's Farmer. Thank you so much for reminding me to update that article title. You're right, there are no potatoes in that recipe! I noticed the issue last week, but completely spaced on correcting it until seeing your comment this morning. Thank you!!

ArkieGirl72638
10/23/2013 10:46:35 AM
Is it just me??? Where are the rustic potatoes?? The Frittata sounds great...but I love my potatoes with dinner...








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