Homemade Dijon Mustard Recipe

This delicious Dijon Mustard Recipe champions simplicity with just a few key ingredients.
By Rick Field and Rebecca Courchesne
Fall 2013
Add to My MSN

Tangy and creamy, Dijon mustard may very well be the perfect condiment.
Photo by Fotolia/Viktorija


Content Tools

Related Content

To Hang Or Not To Hang

I started hanging clothes five years ago, shortly before we bought the farm, and I just can’t go bac...

Make Your Own Mustard

We make relish and pickles, why not mustard?

For the Love of a Glove

Gloves might seem like an ordinary object on a ranch or a farm, but this author thinks they are a wo...

Harvesting Mustard Seeds

I tried growing mustard with the idea of harvesting the seeds to make my own mustard. I wouldn't say...

MAIN ARTICLE:
Craft Your Own Homemade Condiments

Dijon Mustard Recipe

Yields 2 half-pints

The famed mustard associated with Dijon, France, is easy to make. Some versions require grinding whole mustard seeds and spices. This one, however, champions simplicity by combining dry mustard with a few essential ingredients. The result is smooth and creamy, and not too hot.

1 1⁄3 cups (4 ounces) dry mustard
1⁄2 cup water
2 cups (16 fluid ounces) dry white wine or flat champagne
1 yellow onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt

Have ready hot, sterilized jars and their lids.

In bowl, stir together mustard and water until smooth. Set aside.

In small nonreactive saucepan, combine wine, onion and garlic. Bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium, and stir in sugar and salt. Simmer, uncovered, stirring often, until reduced by half, about 20 minutes.

Pour wine mixture through fine-mesh sieve into mustard and stir until combined. Transfer to saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mixture is thickened, about 20 minutes.

Spoon hot mustard into prepared jars, leaving 1⁄4 inch headspace. Remove any air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe rims clean and seal tightly with lids. Store in refrigerator for up to 1 year.

Note: For best flavor, let mustard stand for 2 weeks before using.

Variations:

Honey Dijon Mustard
Omit the sugar, and stir in 2 tablespoons honey before transferring the mustard to the jars.

Tarragon Dijon Mustard
Add 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon before transferring the mustard to the jars.

Dijon With Mustard Seeds
Add 2 teaspoons brown mustard seeds during the last 5 minutes of cooking time.

Reprinted with permission from The Art of Preserving, published by Weldon Owen, 2010.








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Want to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $19.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $19.95 for a one year subscription!