Easy Homemade Ketchup Recipe

This Homemade Ketchup Recipe is as tasty as it is easy to make.
By Karen Keb
Fall 2013
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Simple and fresh, a good homemade ketchup recipe is a thing of beauty.
Photo by Karen K. Will


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Craft Your Own Homemade Condiments

Homemade Ketchup Recipe

Yields 2 to 3 cups

Fresh ketchup cannot be compared to the bright red, corn syrup-laced material that comes from a squeeze bottle. This simple recipe, which doesn’t require peeling or coring of tomatoes, is worth the time spent in the kitchen. Make enough to last throughout the year.

3 pounds ripe heirloom tomatoes, chopped
1 medium onion, minced
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
2 whole cloves
2 teaspoons celery seeds
1 inch cinnamon stick, broken
1 teaspoon smoked or sweet paprika
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1⁄3 cup brown sugar
1⁄3 cup apple cider vinegar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon sea salt

Place tomatoes, onion, garlic, peppercorns, dry mustard, allspice, cloves, celery seeds, cinnamon stick, paprika and cayenne in stockpot and bring to simmer. Cook gently, stirring frequently, for about 40 minutes, or until about 1⁄3 of juices have evaporated. Let stand for at least 30 minutes to cool.

Purée tomato mixture in pan using immersion blender, or use blender and process at highest speed for 1 minute, pulsing to start.

Run mixture through food mill using finest-mesh screen — or use a chinois or fine-mesh strainer — into clean saucepan. Bring to simmer, and then add brown sugar, vinegar, lemon juice and sea salt. Simmer, stirring frequently, for about 1 hour, or until ketchup is thickened. Allow to cool to room temperature. Taste and adjust spices as needed.

Note: To store homemade ketchup, freeze in freezer jars or refrigerate in recycled plastic bottle for up to 3 weeks. To use frozen ketchup, thaw and simmer in saucepan for 15 to 20 minutes to allow extra water to evaporate.








Post a comment below.

 

HomespunLifeInTheCity
10/8/2014 8:27:09 AM
Debra - here are directions for canned ketchup: http://www.cappersfarmer.com/food-and-entertaining/recipes/can-your-own-ketchup.aspx Enjoy!

Debbra
10/7/2014 2:12:43 PM
I don't freeze very much. I prefer to can everything. I have lost stuff I had frozen one time too many due to power outages here. Is there any directions for caning the ketchup?

Ajidulce
5/6/2014 11:49:41 AM
Never heard of Freezer Jars or that you could freeze in a jar. Please enlighten me on this?...








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