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Make Your Own Mustard

12/24/2013 8:20:00 AM

Tags: Mustard, Cooking, Urban Homesteading, Gardening

We make our own relishes and our own pickles, so I thought it would be fun to try making other condiments as well. After doing a little research I discovered that making mustard is super easy, and it can be customized in many ways.

Making mustard turned out to be a perfect winter project. I found a few recipes online and combined them to make my own version. The first hurdle was finding mustard seeds. Mustard seeds come in black, brown, and yellow, with yellow being the most common. Our local food coop sells many spices and herbs in bulk at low prices. I found brown and yellow seeds there at reasonable prices. Next year we will plant our own mustard in an effort to harvest the seeds for making mustard in the fall.

Mustard Seeds to Soak

There are lots of possible add-ins to mustard. One that caught my eye is horseradish. Jim and I have talked about growing horseradish next year for our beet relish – now we have another reason – and it will be a great addition to our mustard!

Ready for some DIY mustard? Here’s what you’ll need:

Homemade Mustard:

¼ cup brown mustard seeds

¼ cup yellow mustard seeds

½ cup white vinegar or white wine vinegar

¼ cup white wine

2 tbsp cider vinegar

1 tsp honey or agave nectar

1 tsp salt

½ tsp each garlic and onion powder

Soak seeds in vinegar and wine in the refrigerator for 24 to 48 hours. Remove the mixture and then add the rest of your ingredients to a food processor or strong blender; puree until it reaches your desired consistency. I like mustard that is somewhat chunky so the seeds don’t bother me – you’ll never get it completely smooth with this recipe.

Blended Mustard









All Done!


Put into jars and store in refrigerator.








If you have a DIY mustard recipe of your own, please share it in the comment box. I’d also love to hear how your mustard turns out!



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Mary
1/2/2014 11:26:37 AM
Erin, I can't see me making mustard as we eat so little, but I'm definitely going to keep your recipe in my "sustainable living" folder. When/if life gets tough, that type of thing is appreciated when the variety of food isn't available. Now to make sure mustard seeds are stored, also.



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