The Civil War: Andersonville Lacked Clean Drinking Water

Prisoners struggled to find good drinking water before a spring was found inside Andersonville.

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I can verify what the writer from Kansas wrote concerning the Andersonville Prison during the Civil War. My father was a soldier in the Civil War and was shot through the arm in the Battle of Gettysburg. My mother's brother (Uncle Lorenzo) was taken prisoner and placed in the Andersonville Prison. They were so badly in need of good drinking water. Finally a spring of good water broke out in the prison. My uncle was finally set free, but he returned to his family with his health broken and died later.

The heartbreaking point was his wife did not remain true to him, and a little stranger was born in his home.

Harriet Bunch
Newburg, Missouri


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then CAPPER’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from CAPPER’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.