Depression Era Entertainment: Barn Dances

Kansas woman describes entertainment in the depression era, including barn dances and literaries at the local school.

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Entertainment in the depression era was literary meetings in schoolhouses, and people visiting neighbors and relatives as well as barn dances. The loft floor in the barn would be waxed and the fiddler and caller would get it started. Waltzes, one-steps, two-steps, polkas and schottisches would be performed.

Literaries in the schoolhouse with music – stringed instruments, singing, plays, debates, and readings - were enjoyed.

Neighbors visited a lot and spent enjoyable evenings entertaining themselves with games and conversation.

Agnes Saunders
Wellington, Kansas

Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.