Canned Salmon and Turnip Kraut: Making Ends Meet During the Depression Era

Missouri woman talks about how families during the depression era survived with scarce food; she describes using canned salmon, canned corn, turnip kraut, and cornbread
CAPPER's Staff
Good Old Days
Add to My MSN


Content Tools

Related Content

Chickens in The Pig Pen

My daddy's mix of chickens and pig

Knives Fit for a Lady to Collect and Use - Glass Knives

Cave men knapped glass knives for hunting. During the Great Depression glass knives became quite the...

Cornbread Memories

Simple pleasures help soothe the complicated pressures of life.

Saving For The Future

We are learning not to waste anything, not even rotted trees.

During the depression era, our diet got monotonous, but we were never as bad as some we knew. People with lots of turnips and not much else tried fixing them every way, even turnip kraut.

We bought no meat except canned salmon. It could be fixed so many ways to stretch for ten. We ate it made into soup made with milk, or made into fish cakes, and my sis made lots of it into a baked escalloped salmon dish. We also bought canned corn and it was made into soup with crackers. We churned our own butter and I often took a turn at cranking the old daisy churn. We had biscuits every morning, and took them as sandwiches in our school lunches at first. No one used bakery bread then. We ate cornbread or whole wheat bread baked like cornbread, often the grains were taken to the mill at town for the cornmeal and graham flour. If we ran out of it mother baked white flour "batter bread" for supper. It was cut out like cornbread, too, what is called "spoon bread" in the south.

Jewell Cooper
Bolivar, Missouri


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community. 

 

 








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Want to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $19.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $19.95 for a one year subscription!