Children Hide Broken Bowl in Outhouse

While their mother is away at a meeting, children break her favorite bowl and hide the pieces in the outhouse.

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One day my mother was attending a P.T.A. meeting. As children will do when an adult is not around, things got out of hand. My brother brought his stilts in the house and was walking them by the dining table. The table was one of the old round tables with pedestal-type legs.

My brother lost his balance and over went the table, breaking my mother's prized possession, a little blue and white sugar bowl. This is where the fun ended. What would we do? Then one of us thought, throw the pieces in the old pit toilet!

Sorry I don't remember the outcome of our decision. But I am sure we didn't come out "scot free."

Lillie M. Haynes
Decatur, Texas


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.