Milk Snake Run-In on Colorado Homestead

Young girl on Colorado homestead was tormented with fright as a milk snake slithered in and took her piece of homemade bread away.
CAPPER’s Staff
Good Old Days
Add to My MSN

The next time you see a milk snake on the prairie, you'd better make sure you're not holding bread with butter!
jfarah/Fotolia


Content Tools

Related Content

Stages of a Homesteader

The stages of a homesteader and how we go from obsessive interest to peaceful stability.

Soup - Winter's Perfect Comfort Food

Learn to can your own homemade soups and always have a hot, hearty meal waiting in your pantry.

Snake Proofing the Coop

No snakes allowed! Ways to keep snakes (and other pests) out of your chicken coop.

Frustrations of a First-Time Milker

The first month of hand milking my goat has not been an easy one.

This incident happened in June, 1912, when I was visiting my parents on a Colorado homestead in the dry land country of northern Colorado.

One beautiful warm morning Mother and I stopped our work for a snack. We gave my 2 1/2-year-old daughter a piece of bread spread with fresh butter, and she went outside and sat down in her little chair to eat it.

Mother and I were visiting when we heard the baby scream. I rushed outside in time to see a large spotted snake crawling away with the bread in its mouth.

As soon as she saw me, the child stopped crying and said, "The mouse took my bread!"

She had scratches on her hand from playing with a kitten, and I was sure the snake had bitten her. After some fearful moments we realized she had not been hurt.

We were told later that the snake that stole the bread probably was a milk snake attracted by the fresh butter. 

Mrs. I. H. Drennon
Fort Collins, Colorado


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community. 








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Want to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $19.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $19.95 for a one year subscription!