Picking Up Cow Chips in Western Kansas

One day of picking up cow chips in western Kansas paid significantly for the time.

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A farmer, living near my father's homestead in western Kansas at the turn of the century, hired me to pick up cow chips for him.

I would hitch the horses to a wagon early in the morning and drive four or five miles to the cattle range. By the time I had filled the wagon with cow chips, delivered them to the farmer, and returned home, it was late evening. I was paid one dollar for my day's work.

Floyd Morgan
Vashon, Washington


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.