Letters to the Editor from the Fall 2016 Issue

Readers talk about learning to read, rediscovering Capper's Farmer, and zest for life.

Margie McCollough

Margie McCollough, of Eagle Grove, Iowa, who is 92 years old, makes prayer shawls for people in her community who are in need of prayer support.

Photo courtesy Dean DeVore

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Great Magazine

I wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your magazine. Growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, it was a great deal of fun to visit the small Oklahoma town where our farmer relatives lived. We stayed at my grandparents’ house, and they always had the Capper’s Weekly, along with a few other farm magazines.

It was with great happiness that I rediscovered your magazine a couple years back at my local grocery store. I’m glad you brought it back – and I love the new design.

Thanks for a great magazine. Keep up the good work.

Linda Rader
Spring Hill, Kansas

Thanks for the kind words, Linda. It’s a joy to be part of a team that puts together a magazine that brings such happiness to our readers. – Editors


Learned to Read With Your Magazine

I love your magazine. I’m 84 years old, and I’ve seen many changes in the publication through the years. At age 31⁄2, my mom used the Capper’s Weekly to teach me to read. I miss my parents and the country lifestyle, but I’m so pleased to still have Capper’s Farmer in my life.

Please don’t ever stop publishing it!

Ina Ranger
Rogersville, Alabama

Sounds like your mom was a smart lady, Ina. Thanks for sharing this with us. – Editors


Zest for Life

As a district manager for Capper’s Insurance Service, Inc., part of the Ogden Publications family, I meet a lot of people. Earlier this year, agent Daird Korth and I met a wonderful woman by the name of Margie McCollough in rural Eagle Grove, Iowa.

Margie is 92 years young, and still does a great ministry for her local church, despite having lost most of her eyesight. Even so, she certainly hasn’t lost her zest for life.

For the last six years, Margie has been making prayer shawls for the church to distribute to people in need of prayer support. Each shawl is delivered with a card that reads: “As you wrap this Prayer Shawl around you, may you feel the warmth and comfort of God’s love, and may it remind you that you are in the prayers of our church family. God Bless you. Eagle Grove United Methodist Church.”

So far, Margie has completed 535 shawls – an average of about 90 per year. She knits all the shawls with yarn she purchases herself, and she also donates her time.

I thought hearing about her could teach us all something about turning lemons into lemonade.

Dean DeVore
Manson, Iowa

Thanks for sharing this, Dean. You’re an inspiration, Margie. Keep doing what you’re doing. – Editors