Green Tomato Mincemeat, and Other Depression Era Recipes

New York woman offers recipes for green tomato mincemeat, molasses cookies, and one-egg cake that her family used during the depression era.
CAPPER's Staff
Good Old Days
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My father talks about how during the depression era, his family would eat the potato peelings at one meal and the potatoes at the next meal to keep from going hungry.They collected dandelion greens to eat. They had a vegetable garden and fruit trees.

Here are some recipes from that time:

GREEN TOMATO MINCEMEAT

1 peck green tomatoes (cut up)
5 pounds brown sugar
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons ground cloves
2 tablespoons cinnamon
2 tablespoons allspice
1 cup vinegar

Bring to a boil.

Add:
1 pound raisins
1 pound currants
1/2 peck apples (cut up)
Cook until thick.
Put into canning jars and seal.

 MOLASSES COOKIES

1 cup molasses
1/2 cup soft shortening
21/2 cups flour
13/4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ginger

Allow dough to stand at room temperature 20 - 30 minutes. Roll out very thin. Cut rounds with floured cutter. Bake about 7 minutes at 350 degrees.

ONE EGG CAKE 

Combine:
1/2 cup butter 1 cup sugar 1 egg
2 cups flour (sifted)
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
Pinch of salt
2 teaspoons baking powder

Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until sides pull away from edge of pan.

Meredith Sorenson
Fairport, New York


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