The Civil War: While Soldiers Suffered Hardships, Struggled Continued for Those Left Behind

Mothers and wives carried on the struggle at home as the men endured hardships among the Civil War troops.

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Many soldiers suffered in the Civil War, enduring hardships such as long marches without sufficient clothing or food. It is true the generals planned and executed war strategy, although the mothers and wives left at home wrote the lines of that epic struggle. For example, my mother was one of those left on a farm with two babies. My father volunteered in the struggle as his brother-in-law promised to look after my mother. However, this brother-in-law failed to keep his promise.

She would leave the older one (who could sit on the floor and play) with a pan of water to play in, while she carefully placed the baby safely back on the bed, while she did the outside work such as feeding stock and chickens, milking the cow and getting in her fuel.

We are thankful that our boys and their families are better cared for now.

Herman Clark
Winchester, Kansas

Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then CAPPER’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from CAPPER’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.