Open Session: May/June 2010

What readers think.
By CAPPER'S readers
May/June 2010
Add to My MSN

This photo of my brother, Bob Walz, on his horse was taken several years ago when he worked on a ranch.
Betty L. Dame - Whitehall, Michigan


Content Tools

Related Content

First Farm Babies

This year was the first year we had babies born on the farm.

Open Session: What Readers Think

Grandmotherly love – I’ve just reread the May issue, and I was especially touched by the Tenness...

The End Of Our First Summer

We winterized the house and hoped for the best, but we didn’t want to leave.

Summer Dreams

Kellsey loves everything about summer, with the exception of triple digit temperatures. But even the...

Good Memories

For many years, my brother, Bob Walz, and I read Capper’s. We called each other every time we received an issue and discussed the articles. We especially enjoyed discussing the articles that brought back memories of our childhood days on the farm back in Kansas.

Bob passed away last November. The phone calls with my brother have ceased, but not the wonderful memories. I will continue reading Capper’s and wondering what he would have said about each article.

Thank you for reminding us of such pleasant memories over the years. I am really enjoying the new format. Keep up the good work.

Betty L. Dame - Whitehall, Michigan

We’re glad our articles helped you and Bob reminisce about your childhood, Betty, and we hope you continue to enjoy your Capper’s issues. – Editors

 

Still a Fan

My grandmother took Capper’s Weekly when I was a child, and she read it to me until I was old enough to read it myself. I couldn’t help being influenced by all the articles and stories, and I’m sure my life was patterned after all the good people who wrote those letters.

In the 1940s, I wrote my own letter to Capper’s Weekly, and I was thrilled when I saw it in print. My name was Mrs. William Hirst, and my husband had left for the Army.

Because of that letter being printed, I heard from another young woman who was in a similar situation, and we became pen-pal friends.

I am 84 years old now, and I still take Capper’s. (I wonder how many other readers can say that.) Capper’s is still the good publication it has always been.

Mary Hawks - Hutchinson, Kansas

We’re happy to hear you’ve been a loyal reader all these years, Mary. We, too, would like to know how many others have been reading Capper’s that long. We’ll forward any letters we receive to you, Mary, and maybe you can find another pen-pal friend through Capper’s. – Editors

 

Life on the Farm

My parents subscribed to Capper’s Weekly for many years. After my wife and I were married for a number of years, my mother gave us a gift subscription, and we have been taking it ever since.

We enjoyed the article "Metaphor Menagerie" (January/February) by Terri Schlichenmeyer. My wife and I both grew up on a farm and had farm animals, so it brought back many memories.

Terri’s statement about the cows coming home at milking time was pretty much the way it was around my family’s farm, too. If they didn’t all come to the barn to be milked at milking time, we could usually get them to amble in by calling, "Come boss. Come boss." Back then we milked by hand – until we got a milking machine in the 1950s, which made the job a lot easier and faster.

Terri also mentioned that pigs would eat almost anything, and that was also pretty much true of our pigs – except they wouldn’t eat raw potato peelings. If the potatoes were cooked, they would eat them. So, we would cook potatoes in a 50-gallon drum, and the pigs would devour them.

The cows, however, would eat the potatoes raw. In fact, I remember many years ago when the price of potatoes was down, and there was a surplus of them, some of the cattlemen fed potatoes to their cattle in the feedlots.

We enjoy our Capper’s magazine very much. We still live in the country, and the articles in the magazine help us to relive some of the enjoyable times of our growing-up years.

Gary Bennett - Prosser, Washington

 

Help a Child

I would like to thank all the people who sent me letters telling me about places that recycle greeting cards. I received an enormous response.

I am passing along a couple of addresses in case others would like to donate their used greeting cards. These places use the cards to help children. They accept pretty much all types of greeting cards. They are:

St. Jude Children’s Hospital, c/o ALSAC Dept., 333 N. Lauderdale St., Memphis, TN 38101.

St. Jude’s Ranch for Children, ATTN: Donor Office, P.O. Box 60100, Boulder City NV 89006-0100.

Mildred Windholz - Victoria, Kansas

Thank you for the information, Mildred. We’re glad we could broker this con-nection. – Editors

 

Thank You

My mom, who subscribed to Capper’s for more than 60 years, recently passed away, and I just wanted to say thanks for publishing this magazine that gave my mom such joy. Mom loved Capper’s.

She kept a lot of Capper’s clippings in the old cigar box that holds her recipes.

I also subscribe to Capper’s – a tradition handed down from mother to daughter. You have published a couple of my articles in the Heart of the Home section, and my mom was very proud whenever I had something published.

Thanks again.

Lorna Bruns Kahl - Via e-mail


Previous | 1 | 2 | Next






Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Want to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $19.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $19.95 for a one year subscription!