Praise for Country Churches

One man’s opinion says smaller is better when it comes to churches.
By Don Dilmore
July/August 2009
Add to My MSN

Rural country churches make members of their congregation feel like part of a real family.
iStockphoto.com/DHuss


Content Tools

Related Content

Let's Bring Back Bartering

Lori and her farmer son, Bryan, assist a neighbor with an otherwise overwhelming job on their farm, ...

Boys and Girls

What happens when you try to show a teenage boy something and you are a preteen girl.

Summer Dreams

Kellsey loves everything about summer, with the exception of triple digit temperatures. But even the...

What is a Kitchen Garden?

Highly productive small gardens that produce huge yields

I am a city boy who moved to the country several years ago. For a while, we continued to go into the city twice a week for church. I couldn’t imagine a Sunday school class of five or six men, or a congregation of less than 100. I was used to belonging to a large, city church. My wife grew up in the country and had attended a country church. She knew there was a difference, but she waited patiently for me to agree to visit a country church.

Several years ago we decided to try the country church down the road a piece from where we live. After attending that church for two weeks, I vowed, for several reasons, never to go back to the city for church.

In most big-city churches I’ve attended, you may get to know a few people who sit around you or who are in your Bible study class, but many will remain strangers, particularly if you are not outgoing.

If you really want to feel the love of God fully expressed through His people, go to a country church. The people there exhibit God’s love in many ways. For example, from the moment you enter Sunday school at our church and for 30 minutes after the last “Amen” in the worship service, everyone hugs everyone. The congregation is happy to see each other, and they show it.

In our former big-city church, if you have a prayer concern, you write it on a card and drop it in the collection plate. At our country church, time is given during the worship service for folks to call out their concerns for others in the congregation, as well as those in the community who aren’t members.

We have fun in our worship service. As the hymn “Down in My Heart” says, “I have the joy, joy, joy joy, down in my heart,” and it applies to every member of our church.

Speaking of music, country churches don’t have any of those newfangled screens with the words to the songs. We don’t need drums, trumpets, guitars and a praise team. We still use hymn books and sing songs with theological meaning. If you see a guitar, it is in the hands of the person bringing the special musical message. We don’t have a choir loft with 150 voices. We simply praise the Lord without a lot of trained voices and fancy robes.

Word goes out when a member is sick, and casseroles are soon on their way. We provide our own Meals on Wheels. When Hurricane Ike hit, checks were disbursed, not only to member families who had damaged homes, but also to others in the community.

We meet in a church that was built in 1863. Any additions made are paid for as constructed. Stained glass windows are given in memory of loved ones. Our only debt is to God. There is only one worship service, and the children aren’t taken someplace else for their own service or to play video games.

The members of our church get together several times a year for a good, ole country-cooked lunch after worship service, and everyone has fun. We especially enjoy baptisms, in which the entire congregation goes to the lake for the ceremony. It’s amazing to see picnickers and swimmers stop what they’re doing and spiritually join in.

If you want to attend a worship service where children and adults worship God together, and where you feel like part of a real family, find a little country church. Once you’ve attended one, I think you’ll agree they are the best.

Editor’s note: We love how much Don loves his new church (although we’ve also been to some big-city churches that demonstrated love-in-action like he describes here). What about you? What do you love about your place of worship? Send us a letter – and a photo if you have a good one – to Capper’s Editor, 1503 S.W. 42nd St., Topeka, KS 66609, or e-mail editor@Cappers.com.


Previous | 1 | 2 | Next






Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today
First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
 

Want to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $5 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $19.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $19.95 for a one year subscription!