Neighbors Hide Savings for Hard Times During the Civil War

Daughter overhears where savings are hidden, but misunderstands hard times.

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My mother-in-law's father told this story of the Civil War about their neighbors. Before the father went to war, the mother and father discussed where they would hide their savings during the war, putting it away for hard times. Their little daughter overheard the conversation and knew where the money was hidden.

One day her mother was working in the fields and the little girl was at the house when some guerrilla fighters rode in. After inquiring about her parents, they asked if she had money or anything that could help them. She said they had some money, but they were saving it for "hard times."

"Why, that's who we are!" exclaimed one of the men. "We're Hard Times!"

So the little girl got the money and gave it to them.

Mrs. Kenneth Heistand
Columbus, Kansas


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then CAPPER’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from CAPPER’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.