School Children Survive Tornado

Brother and teacher saved the day at their one-room school.

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My story goes back to sixth grade. It was a nice sunny day in September. We were having History class in the front of the room. This was about 2:30 in the afternoon. My younger brother had just returned from the outhouse. He came and whispered in my ear that the sky looked funny. I sensed that he was frightened. I told our teacher, Miss Jones, and she immediately went to check the sky. Upon her return, she told the whole school to follow her out of doors. When we all got out of the school, she told us to cross the road and lie down in the ditch. We all did - and it wasn't long before we heard a terrible roaring wind. The tornado was passing through a field about 200 feet to the south. This tornado left a path of destruction for many miles.

Thanks to my 6-year-old brother and a very caring teacher, no harm came to us.

Marjorie Goodman
Cedar Rapids, Iowa


Back in 1955 a call went out from the editors of the then Capper’s Weekly asking for readers to send in articles on true pioneers. Hundreds of letters came pouring in from early settlers and their children, many now in their 80s and 90s, and from grandchildren of settlers, all with tales to tell. So many articles were received that a decision was made to create a book, and in 1956, the first My Folks title – My Folks Came in a Covered Wagon – hit the shelves. Nine other books have since been published in the My Folks series, all filled to the brim with true tales from Capper’s readers, and we are proud to make those stories available to our growing online community.