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Making Money

Three first-grade boys are in the school yard bragging to one another about their fathers' occupations.

The first boy says, 'My dad scribbles a few words on a piece of paper, calls it a poem, and he makes $500.'

The second boy says, 'That's nothing. My dad scribbles a few words on a piece of paper, calls it a song, and he gets paid $1,000 for it.'

'I've got you both beat,' says the third little boy. 'My dad scribbles a few words on a piece of paper, calls it a sermon, and it takes eight people to collect all the money he makes!'

John - Ohio

Final Answer !

Two students at the University of Alabama were quite confident about their final exam in chemistry, so they decided to go up to the University of Tennessee two days before the final to get together with some friends.

They had a great time, but they got back late and missed the final exam. They pleaded with the professor to let them make up the test, telling him that they'd gone to Tennessee to visit some friends, and on their way home, they'd had a flat tire. They said they'd waited hours before anyone stopped to pick them up. They went on and on about how much bad luck they'd had on their return trip, so finally, the professor agreed to let them take a make-up test.

Later that afternoon, the professor put each boy in a different room to take the exam. There were five questions on the first page, each one worth one point. Both boys worked through the questions, thinking that the exam was going to be a breeze.

When they turned to the second page, however, they knew the odds of them passing were slim to none. The only question on the page read: 'Think carefully. This question is worth 95 points. Question: Which tire on the car went flat on your way home from Tennessee?'

Cal - Alabama

Heritage Questioned

A young polar bear came into the den and asked his mother, 'Am I a real polar bear, Mommy?'

'Of course you are,' his mother said.

He then asked his father, 'Dad, am I a real polar bear?'

'You sure are,' his father replied.

A week later, the innocent little polar bear asked his parents, 'Are Grandma and Grandpa real polar bears?'

'Yes,' his parents said.

After another week, the young cub asked, 'Mommy, are all my relatives real polar bears?'

'Yes, they're all real polar bears,' his mother replied. 'Why do you keep asking us these questions?'

'Because,' said the little polar bear, 'I'm freezing!'

Vicki - Oklahoma