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Ebbleskewers, Milkweed Pod and Teasel Weed

10/30/2013 12:52:00 PM

Tags: Ebbleskewer Recipe, Milkweed Pod, Teasel Weed, M-C Hartman

M-C HartmanWow!  What a great, fun visit down memory lane this month’s edition of Capper’s Farmer magazine was!  The wonderful Susi Jacobson article “Foraging for a Fall Wreath” brought back memories of Mother pulling over the car repeatedly throughout the fall while travelling down roads and byways to “harvest” teasel weed, milk weed pods and other interesting dry plant materials.  Mom was very creative and would turn these articles of nature into pictures, flower arrangements, wreaths and other wonderful decorative products with a little glue, glitter, paint, and brain power.  I grin thinking of her creativity every time I buzz by a patch of milkweed pod bursting, or teasel weed standing tall and prickly in salute.  

And then farther on in the magazine I turned the page and low and behold a magnificent article on what we called in our family “Ebbleskewers”!  Mom’s Grandparents came over on the boat from Denmark, so one of my inheritances from her is her Ebbleskewer pan.  I got so excited reading the interesting and creative recipes shared and so much of the history of this wonderful “pancake” from my childhood that I promptly began soaking bread overnight in milk, dug out the pan, and the next day invited Dad over for a brunch with Mike and me.  Linsey Knerl, thank you for reminding me of my Nana and that wonderful joy.  And for giving my Father, husband, and myself a special brunch together to boot!  For us, Ebbleskewers were an extra Christmas time treat.  We have a basic recipe passed down to us which I thought I would share with you.  It is not the lovely fancy ones listed in Linsey’s article, but it is a nice recipe that is not hard to make if you have the pan.

Nana’s Ebbleskewer Recipe

Soak 3 medium slices of white bread in one quart of buttermilk overnight.  Add four cups flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon baking soda, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 2 tablespoons melted butter.  Beat 4 eggs well and add.  Slice thin pieces of apple to insert into the batter after poured into the pan.  Heat Ebbleskewer pan on medium heat.  Fill greased Ebbleskewer pan ½ full.  Turn Ebbleskewers (we just turned them fully over 180 degrees one time) using a fork once the bottom sections have browned.  Serve with confectioner’s sugar and/or honey.

In our more health conscious age, I used sprouted wheat bread instead of the white bread, and whole wheat flour instead of standard flour.  Dad still liked them and Mike told me in all the years we have been married he did not remember me ever cooking them, so he did not have anything to compare them to.  They were a hit and I am looking forward to trying Linsey’s recipes.  We were too busy enjoying the food for me to remember to take a picture for you, so please enjoy Karen Keb’s pictures in Linsey’s article instead!  And her recipes!



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Post a comment below.

 

Valerie
11/30/2013 9:59:23 PM
Loved this MC. Valerie from Root Farm ~ We make Montana Mosquitoes with our teasel. Nice ideas to look forward to trying. Have a great day.

Valerie
11/30/2013 9:57:11 PM
Loved this MC. Valerie from Root Farm ~ We make Montana Mosquitoes with our teasel. Nice ideas to look forward to trying. Have a great day.

NebraskaDave
11/3/2013 9:24:37 AM
M-C, it kind of fun being able to make things that our grandmas used to make. Being a boy I didn't get to learn any of those skills as men's work was outside the kitchen. ***** My mother had a creative side that was always working. She too would stop and harvest weeds along the roadside. Her two favorites were the milkweed pods and the cat tails. Our holiday center pieces were always some kind of weed arrangement that had been sprayed with varnish or paint. It always looking pretty dog gone good for just a bunch of weeds. ***** Have a great Ebbleskewer and Teasel Weed day.

Mary
11/1/2013 11:16:21 AM
Hi, "Mary from "Old Dog, New Tricks." What a neat blog and how fun to have stumbled on to the ideas from Capper's Magazine. I thought it a great magazine, also! My mother and Aunt Vi used to gather all the good materials from our Iowa farm and other places and made beautiful bouquets. I do think we should leave the milkweed pods, now, since they are becoming an extinct food source for the Monarch butterfly. Mom & Aunt Vi used to spray paint them beautiful colors for their bouquets, but times change. Anyway, I enjoyed your blog!



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