Enjoys Freezing and Canning Food From the Garden

Summers spent freezing and canning food for the winter months.
Heart of the Home
May/June 2013
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A batch of green beans from the garden will keep their fresh flavor when canned in a pressure cooker.
Photo By Fotolia/Henk Jacobs


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Another reason we try to eat less processed foods.

I love canning and freezing the bounties of my vegetable garden.

I have a cutter for corn, which creams it as it cuts the kernels off the cobs. I freeze it raw, with ice water and a little salt.

The green beans get canned. To make the process simple, I snip the ends off, and then hold them in my hand until I get a handful, and then I use a sharp knife to cut them all at once, so they’re uniform in size. Then it’s time to wash them and get them ready to put into jars. Once they’re in the jars, I pressure cook them at 10 pounds for 25 minutes, and the canned greed beans turn out perfectly.

I know some people get tired of gardening and canning food, but I don’t. I love it, and I’ll keep doing it as long as I can. There is great satisfaction in seeing all those jars of fresh food from the garden.

Martha
Arthur, Illinois

Read more about home canning in Stories of Food Preservation Methods.  








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