Cappers Farmer Blogs > A Small Town Gal

Buggy for Sale

By Mel Boone


Tags: various sales and auctions, sale day, Amish buggy, Missouri, Mel Boone,

Mel BooneGoing to various sales and auctions, you never know what you might find. This summer at a local auction, which happened to be of the first day of the flywheel reunion, there were items for sale that I didn't expect to be there. Among the farm tractors and implements there were some Amish buggies for sale. A few of them were the open buggies that the Amish use, and one was the kind that was I call a "closed in buggy." I'm not sure what the Amish really call it.

Buggy

In the part of Missouri where I live there are a few Amish communities. They are not as big as some of the other Amish communities here in Missouri, but they are here. I've seen them ever since I was a little girl, and I suspect that they made their home here long before I was born.

Even though I don't have any Amish friends, the ones that I've been around have always been nice to me. They have always had a smile on their faces and seem to be happy to say hello. The ones that know my stepdad always find the time to visit for a few minutes. I've bought the homemade noodles, pie, and bread that some of the women sell. The taste is absolutely amazing! There's no doubt in my mind that they could teach us "English" a few things about cooking. Their food tops anything that would come out of high-priced restaurant or culinary school.

Their work ethic is amazing. They all work so hard, and they do it without modern technology. How many of us can go without our smartphone, tablet, wi-fi, etc. for any length of time? I was without a computer and internet for four days and then spent two hours trying to rid my inbox of 500 emails.

Now to circle back to that auction. Looking at those buggies sitting among the tractors and implements to be sold, I wondered why these Amish buggies are being sold. A death in the family? Perhaps all the children are grown up and married, so a few of the buggies are no longer needed? Or did a family leave the Amish community to live their life as the "English" do?

I may never know the answer. As an "English" person, my curiosity still makes me wonder.