Neglect of Foundations


| 6/13/2014 8:40:00 AM


Mary ConleyDear friends,

If you are reading my blog for the first time, you missed a series I did on saving our old buildings. It has occurred to me that I haven’t written about one aspect of neglect that we encountered and perhaps it could be a helpful reminder to someone. You see, when buildings are abandoned, shrubs and trees start growing up close to the foundation, and eventually push it in causing cracks and leaning. The men had to first cut away a lot of this growth before beginning repairs on all our buildings.

I want to tell you about a building we still haven’t tackled that has this problem. It is located right next to the barn and was one of my favorites when we first came; maybe because of all the unusual things we found in it. A neighbor told us that it was built by a gravel company and used to repair their machines as they worked nearby. Thus, we call it the pit. We would like to rebuild on the foundation, if possible, because a lot of it is below ground level and would be perfect for a root cellar and other uses. However, time for doing extra hard work is running out on us old folks, so our immediate goal is to get the roof off as the asphalt shingles are beginning to blow all around.

Sewing 

The cleanup: Here is a photo of the inside after a lot of junk had already been removed. Interesting to me were the shelves of magazines, a sewing machine, wood shavings on the floor, and children’s toys. In my imagination, someone later used this for their hobbies while children played at their feet. OK, they probably just dumped their junk there before leaving! Eventually, we completely cleaned it out and it is very roomy with easy access. The tool bench was built to last, and Larry sometimes uses the vise on it. Granddaughter Erin used it to store hay for her animals.



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