Homemade Chorizo Recipe

Fry up this flavorful take on a Spanish favorite to use as side dish for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!



From "Family Table"
June 2018

  • skillet-chorizo
    Chorizo traditionally incorporates the methods of fermentation, curing, and smoking to create a flavorful sausage. However, it’s popularity throughout Europe and the Americas is so widespread that many methods, recipes, and renditions have developed to recreate the savory taste it is known for.
    Photo by Shaye Elliot
  • family-table
    “Family Table” by Shaye Elliot brings the do-it-yourself movement to the kitchen as she relies on whole foods from her homestead to make healthy, unprocessed meals for her family.
    Cover courtesy of Lyons Press
  • skillet-chorizo
  • family-table

Yield: Makes 3 pounds

Family Table (Lyons, 2018), by Shaye Elliot invites you to pull up a chair and take part in the anecdotes and bounty that have been grown, cured, and cooked on the Elliot Homestead. Using simple ingredients, Elliot gathers over 70 of her whole-food recipes that celebrate traditional garden-to-kitchen techniques and healthy eating to share in rich print and vibrant photos. Eliot’s experience building a sustainable farm with her husband and children has provided her with the know-how to bring the Elliot Homestead to life with farming, cooking, and healthy-living advice in her blog and three books. Her first book, From Scratch, shares her motivation in creating a farm-to-table lifestyle for her family. Eliot’s latest book, Welcome to the Farm¸ serves as a guide for readers wishing to build a homestead for themselves.

We raise pigs each year, and it’s for two reasons: bacon and chorizo. This is an excellent meat to crisp up in a skillet and sprinkle on potatoes, rice, salad, sautéed vegetables, or even your morning eggs. It’s rich, so a little goes a long way. Chorizo, like sausage, can be enjoyed a zillion different ways. Breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Eggs, soups, salads, casseroles. You name it. Throw in a few small potatoes to cook alongside the chorizo, toss in some greens and radishes right before serving. And that’s it. Culinary salvation in a skillet.

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds ground pork, at least 30 percent fat (aka: sausage meat)
  • 1 large onion
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon coriander
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 5 cloves
  • 2 allspice berries
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder (or 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes)
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • Red wine

Instructions:

  1. Put the ground pork in a large bowl. Set aside. Ignore the pork. Let the pork be.
  2. Combine the onion, vinegar, cumin, coriander, bay leaves, cloves, allspice berries, cinnamon, oregano, parsley, salt, chile, pepper, paprikas, and garlic together in a food processor or high-powered blender.
  3. Blend the ingredients until smooth, adding red wine as necessary to ensure it all gets blended well together. I just add the wine through the hole at the top of the blender until there’s enough liquid in the mixture to really make it blended.
  4. Combine the sauce and pork with your hands until well combined.
  5. Oh, by the way, that’s it! You’ve now made chorizo. All that’s left is to fry it up. I do this on high heat, because I love it when the chorizo gets little crispy, browned bits.

More from Family Table:

Breakfast Quinoa with Eggs and Smoked Hollandaise Sauce Recipe
Cilantro Aioli Recipe
Roasted Sunchokes with Tomatoes and Lemon Recipe
Asparagus Soup with Poached Eggs Recipe
Oven-Fried Zucchini with Cilantro Aioli Recipe
Instant Berry Ice Cream Recipe
Red Wine and Honey-Poached Pears and Plums Recipe

Reprinted with permission from Family Table: Farm Cooking from the Elliot Homestead by Shaye Elliot and published by Lyons Press, 2018.

Buy Elliot’s other title, Welcome to the Farm: How-To Wisdom from the Elliot Homestead, from the Capper’s Farmer store.