Our First Pig


| 5/21/2014 9:09:00 AM


Amy ConleyWe read a lot of books on farming, my husband more than I do. The goal for our farm is to raise grassfed animals. It makes the meat healthier to eat, and you don’t have to spend a lot of money on feed. With this goal in mind, we have been thinking for a while that we would buy a pig to raise. Our next-door neighbor’s son raises pigs and sells the babies for his homeschool project, so, of course, we wanted to buy one from him.

 

PiggyOne Saturday afternoon we decided to stop by to see when the pigs would be ready. He said they were just about 5 weeks old so we could take one with us right then. I am not sure we were prepared but why not. We seem to learn as we go anyway. So they put the pig in a feed sack so we could get him home, which was just around the corner. He was a little bigger than I pictured a 5-week-old pig to be so there was no holding him on your lap plus he was pretty feisty.

We went home and put him down in the pen with the goats and chickens. He was pretty calm when he came out of the bag. It took a couple minutes for him to realize that he was free to roam. He was in a box with his mother and no room to go anywhere at our neighbors' farm. Once he started running, he didn’t stop. He ran around the perimeter of the fence. That’s it, we thought, never going to catch him again. He ran and ran, chased the goats and chickens and ran some more. Was he ever going to tire himself out?

Piggy in the barnyard



We figured that we should introduce the dog to him since he is always in the pen with the animals. Max, our black Lab, went right over to him and instantly they became friends. We realized the pig just wanted a friend. The goats didn’t want anything to do with him. After a couple days they started to tolerate him.



Subscribe today

Capper's FarmerWant to rediscover what made grandma’s house the fun place we all remember? Capper’s Farmer — the newly restored publication from the rural know-how experts at Grit.com — updates the tried-and-true methods your grandparents used for cooking, crafting, gardening and so much more. Subscribe today and discover the joys of homemade living and homesteading insight — with a dash of modern living — that makes up the new Capper’s Farmer.

Save Even More Money with our automatic renewal savings plan!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our automatic renewal savings plan. You save an additional $6 and get 4 issues of Capper's Farmer for only $16.95 (USA only).

Or, Bill Me Later and I'll pay just $22.95 for a one year subscription!




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter

Free Product Information Classifieds