Homemade Jam and Jelly Lost to Misfortune

After much work, Grandmother's homemade jam and jelly was lost when it fell off the rickety homestead shelf.


| Good Old Days


Minor diseases could be as shattering as major ones for the pioneer family home on a sandy farm in northwest Oklahoma.

Grandmother prepared her winter's store of homemade jam and jelly from wild plums and grapes. Her supply represented hours of work in preparing the fruit, and boiling the juice and sugar on a wood range when temperatures often passed the 100 degree mark. And though the fruit was hers for the picking, purchase of the sugar was made with hard-earned money.

Grandmother stored the jams and jellies on shelves in a cellar.

Heavy rains came that year, drenching the dirt walls of the cellar and soaking the floor. The walls caved in, the shelves collapsed, and the homemade jam and jelly jars fell and broke. The fruits of her labor were lost.



Grandmother, ill from the shock, took to her bed for several days. And her family ate sparingly of jam and jelly that winter. 

Florence Alkire
Seiling, Oklahoma




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