Old Fashioned Deer Hunting


| 10/12/2015 9:24:00 AM


Renee-Lucie Benoit

deer
 

My dad Art, on the right, with his friend Howard and a deer he bagged in Iowa.

My dad Art got interested in bow hunting as a kid in Ohio. My grandmother Daisy reported that he would don a native American headdress and, clutching his little bow and arrow, he would go to sleep. He was also very interested in collecting arrowheads and tomahawks that could be found in the plowed fields. I would go with him and he helped me find my own artifacts. When it was getting close to deer season my dad would take me out to the dried up corn fields at night and we'd scan the fields for deer sign in the dark. We'd usually see deer in the headlights, literally, as they ate the leftover corn from the fields. They were getting grain fed and they were going to be tasty!

My dad was born 1922 near Warren, Ohio. His dad was a French Canadien from the western part of Quebec on the Ontario River. They were all outdoorsmen of necessity. As a child in the depression hunting was a way to get by. After graduating from high school he enlisted in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He flew troop transport planes and towed gliders into France. When the war was over he went back to the life he loved.



My dad's first bow was a 62-inch recurve he bought for $30. At first, he was only interested in shooting at targets. He joined the Isaac Walton League in our home town of Marshalltown, Iowa. They had an archery range and great fish fries every Saturday night. After practicing with his bow for a year he started thinking seriously about hunting deer for the first time since he was a kid.



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