Swiss Chard


| 8/26/2014 12:45:00 PM


Tags: Swiss Chard, Learning, Freezing Chard, New Greens, Mary Conley,

Mary ConleyNow why would any elderly woman want her blog called "Old Dog, New Tricks? Well, I'm not sure I'm fond of that name, but I am happy with how it came about. When we started changing the way we did things in our city yard, and then bought our little farm, I was constantly learning and doing new things. I was daily searching the web and reading the gardening and country magazines. It was amazing how our lives changed, and it was so much fun! Larry and I weren't one of those old couples sitting across the table from one another with blank faces and nothing to talk about. Nope! We were really living and learning. So, when I couldn't come up with a name for my blog and enlisted help, my daughter, Amy, thought "Old Dog, New Tricks" was appropriate.

Why am I telling you this now? Well, my back surgery this spring almost put a stop to the learning and doing of "new" things. Almost! After each of the past several blog posts, I would tell Larry that I didn't have anything to write about, and it possibly might be my last. He got so he rolled his eyes and said, "How many times have I heard that?" This last time, though, I think he believed me. Then, yesterday, I remembered about the Swiss chard. Don't laugh! It was new to me this season, and I want to tell you about it.

Swiss chard

Swiss chard

In the spring, I wrote a post on "Planting for my Vitamix" and explained that I had planted Swiss chard for the first time. Its leaves are green with red veins and are quite similar to beet leaves only larger. I have an abundance and the bugs don't seem to bother it. I was disappointed, though, that I couldn't seem to find smoothy recipes that contained chard, and then I discovered I could throw a few torn leaves into any of my regular fruit smoothies without noticing a difference in the flavor. I love adding the extra nutrition from those fresh greens!

blanching Swiss chard

NebraskaDave
8/28/2014 8:16:31 AM

Mary, glad to see that you have discovered some thing to write about. Chard is an amazing garden plant. It is the most hardy of the green leafy plants that I have ever raised. Long into the cold freezing fall temperatures, chard will continue to produce. Last year I finally pulled it out of the garden just so I could bet the raised bed cleaned up before it got too cold. Chard will survive the hot temperatures of the summer and doesn't really require a whole of watering. It just an all around great leafy green plant. Sadly, I didn't get any planted this year. ***** Have the best recovery day that you can.





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