Easy Growing Vegetables for the Permaculture Garden

Learn effective methods for growing vegetables in a permaculture garden.


| May 2016


Not every aspiring homesteader has access to 5 gently sloping acres of rich, loamy soil. Author Jenni Blackmore presents a highly personal, entertaining account of how permaculture, "permanant agriculture", can be practiced in adverse conditions. Permaculture for the Rest of Us (New Society Publishers, 2015), by Jenni Blackmore, describes how to retrofit even the smallest homestead, illustrating the fundamental principles of this emerging gardening technique in a humorous, reader-friendly way.

You can purchase this book from the Capper's Farmer store: Permaculture for the Rest of Us.

Easy Growing Vegetables

I’ve chosen to mention the following four vegetables here because they are all relatively easy to grow. Also, each has a preference for when it is planted:

Garlic, for instance, likes best to be planted in the late fall. It might have taken all summer to prepare soil and construct a new bed and it’s satisfying to be able to plant right there and then, rather than have the bed remain empty until the next spring. Garlic is the perfect choice.

Chard likes to be planted in early spring. It is very hardy and will grow reasonably well in mediocre soil.

Potatoes are planted mid to late spring and don’t require the kind of perfect soil that develops after several years in a well-tended plot. They also don’t require a lot of soil as they can be heavily mulched with organic material to provide all the cover they need. They’re great for starter plots, especially as the mulch rots down and increases the amount of organic material in the existing soil, thereby increasing the actual amount of soil as the bed is used.





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